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20121001
20121031
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WETA 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
it was a lack of understanding of the importance of the latino community. i think they don't understand how fast we're growing, how influential we have become and how politicians are now forced to respond to the issues that affect latinos. i think that they over saw that. i don't think they really paid attention. >> sometimes we are invisible and we are fighting so hard not to be invisible. the commission of presidential debates are stuck in the 1950s. they still think the country could be divided between men and women and that's it. they do not realize that one in every three persons in the united states is from a minority. they think it is okay it have an african-american president but they don't think it's okay to have an african-american or hispanic journalist as a moderator for the debates. what we did, it was our wonderful response to this oversight, this huge oversight. instead they didn't want to invite us to the party so we had our own party. >> and that party turned out pretty good. >> so, yeah, maybe. >> you mean the presidential forums you're having? >> yes. >> which came after you w
affirmative action was giving higher scores to latino kids and african americans and that they were showing up in school way behind their peers as a result because as you mentioned maybe the education system failed them. then doing very poorly, higher drop out rates, all that sort of thing. what do you think about the position that have article? >> i read the article i thought it was garbage, i think there were a lot of assumptions made that just don't match reality. i mean, i attended university and i think affirmative action enabled me to fully integrate in to the full promise of the education that i got. the article made an assumption that somehow this so-called mismatch actually made it really difficult for african american students to come in to a school and integrate with the majority population of just never seen that. i don't think that we can base our policy on assumption that we make that really don't have any identifiable data behind them. >> we've looked at -- there was one report that came out talking about the racial neutral alternatives which is -- saying when you looked at all
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. first a look at the latino voting with fernando espuelas. also robert glasper is here. his ep features performances by the roots. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are onlyavwe hr . fwaht and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: fernando espuelas is the host of the show that bears his name. he is one of the 100 notable hispanics. thank you for being here. it predicts a record latino turnout this time around. >> it is clear with all this enthusiasm across the nation they really galvanized a lot of people. tavis: i assume he is going to get the lion's share of that vote. >> they are 75%, so mr. romney has the lowest support since its gerald ford. i think mr. romney made a strategic decision to go after the hispanic vote. the republican platform reflects that. tavis: how would you
. that is the reality. i think this is a good argument -- latino voters could provide the margin of victory for him. he will be under a lot of pressure. he will try to get something through on immigration. republicans have changed on immigration since 2004. when george w. bush was president, he realized the power of latino voters. he was pushing the idea of a more permissive immigration policy. the party swung to the right. look at what happened with john mccain. that is not a tenable position long term. in the state where we are right now, across the west, where latinos are becoming more and more decisive, i do not think you can have a policy that is overly-harsh to a latino voters or immigrants. it is a slow move. you watched the primaries and you saw how much the parties embraced this tough rhetoric. romney is paying a price for that. >> i could add to that list. i do not need to, but there are a number of issues that labor has been very quiet about. particularly some of these treaties, labor agreements with other nations. there are a number of things you could put on the list, but i digress on that
that perhaps african-americans and latinos have. we call it sometimes affirmative action for white people, because we made so many things possible for white people. but you have this divide, where white people are, like, "we did not get any help. what are you talking about?" but they did. tavis: the tea party and others are not filled with african american members, so how do you explain that? the people that receive so much help, the gi bill, social security, the things he laid out in the book, how do you explain that the people doing the attacking are by and large people not of color? >> well, we really have a problem in the country of deserving versus undeserving poor. something that you deserve and worked for, other people getting a different kind of help. i think every study shows -- why we saw with the tea party, they would say, "get the government out of my medicare," not realizing that medicare is a government program. the way government has helped them is kind of like the colorless, odorless entity in their lives. a percentage of the budget that goes towards the traditional welfar
by the presidential campaigns for a key voting bloc. >> suarez: although latinos make up the country's largest minority, about 9% of the u.s. electorate, in a tight election, these voters could end up providing the winner with the margin of victory. >> brown: judy woodruff gets an inside view of the financial crisis and the government bailout from former fdic head sheila bair. >> warner: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshou >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: lebanon found itself reliving a nightmarish past today after the worst bombing in four years. at least eight people were killed and nearly 80 wounded in a car-bom
of all americans under 18 are latino. canvassing in colorado, a swing state where the latino vote is hugely important. now, some are disappointed that he has not done more to help the illegal immigrants that come across the border. a few find this election a hard choice. >> we know that there is only one candidate that supports any kind of immigration reform that is of any real value and of course that is obama. romney would turn back any progress we have made. >> a lot of republicans see the hispanic vote as a huge prize. what has gone wrong? when ronald reagan said that latinos were naturally republican, he met that they were aspirational and socially conservative. mitt romney seems to turn them off. he backed a law in arizona which some said was racial profiling. he called for a high-tech fence along the mexican border and struck a hard note talking about illegal immigrants. >> the answer is self deportation, people decide that they can do better work here because they don't have legal documentation. >> the campaign has put on a burst of speed, intensely targeting latinos, espe
'm not sure i buy the identity politics calculation of women's votes and latinos questions. romney will be doing better with everybody. i think you will see poll movement and the narrative will change. we have to wait and see. >> that could be true, mike but why did mitt romney feels he would not deport young voters and allow hem to have visas. you see him tweaking on specific issues that are of interest to hispanic voters and others, you see him changing on policy because he's not addressed issues. >> no, absolutely. >> and that ... it was 70% for obama. i mean you can't win a republican can't win, i don't have to tell you this as a strategist with anything south of 40%. i think mitt romney was 20% -- >> i've been hollering this for three years on the republican party about latinos and there's no doubt romney is moving just like obama had to move issues in his campaign. romney's been late to it but i'm for doing it big like he did tonight and more of it. >> rose: i want to get john back in but katty go ahead. >> this is giving obama the benefit of the doubt about it of conversati
smiley. join me next time for a look at the role of the latino vote this election plus the r&b artist. that is next time. we will see you then. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >> be more. pbs. male announcer: the following program contains mature content which may not be suitable for all audiences. viewer discretion is advised.
's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit from-- blark white, latino, asian. everybody benefits from these cross-racial interactions. and too many of our high schools are racially identified. there's lot of residential segregation leading to segregation in school, not by law but by practice. the result is too many kids don't have these interactionsess until they get to college and are able to learn from each other and break down stereotypes. the ramification of this case could be far reaching depending on how the court rules. >> richard kahlenberg, far-reaching? >> absolutely. this goes to what we mean by equal opportunity in our society. should race count in deciding who gets ahead? how do we create racial diversity in our universities? i agree with debo that it's very important that our leading institutions of higher education have students of all different racial and ethnic groups. my concern with the current affirmative action is that essentially, universities assemble wealthy kids of all colors, and we're not getting that genuine diversity that has to do also with
, some would seem to think that the black americans -- african-americans, his panics and latinos are not part of the working class america that's needed to be vibrant to bring this economy around. >> we've never said that because we don't involve -- we don't get involved in the bulkization of social economic groups. that's what democrats do. >> oh, my god. >> true. we don't sit there and do that. the interesting thing the gap between -- well, the 47%, blacks hispanics or women, he didn't say that. people that are living off of the government role, not out there getting the job. was that a good thing to say? no. but we are not talking about that. the whole idea of race baiting has gotten worse under president obama and the separation between the white working class voted for obama last time, they are not voting for him this time. why is that? or is it true, first of all? >> i don't know that it's true. >> we have to wait until the election and see what happens, number one. number two, i think it's interesting that historically race baiting and the plan of dividing the south and ta
by catholics and some protestants. during this time, many latinos also observe what they call the day of the dead, when it's believed the spirits of the departed return to earth. >>> finally, as we reported, for muslims around the world, the hajj the traditional pilgrimage to mecca began this week. for muslim children at the dar al hijrah islamic center in falls church, virginia, there is a mock hajj where they learn what pilgrims to mecca do by pretending to do the same things at their weekend school. our guide was imam johari abdul-malik. >> the journey to this house once in your lifetime is, in the islamic tradition, a requirement. and so people will leave their familiar and they will come to this house established by abraham. but 6 million people cannot fit inside this house and so people will pray around the house. seven circuits around the ka'ba is the tradition. and in the corner of the ka'ba, there is the black stone, which, it is believed by muslims, to have fallen from heaven. when hagar was left in mecca, by abraham, with her baby, she was looking for water. and the traditi
, through advertising, its latino voters, too; an update on the deadly attack at the u.s. consulate in libya; why is the great barrier reef disappearing?; and the macarthur geniuses. but first, with the other news of the day, here's kwame holman. >> holman: j.p. morgan chase now faces a major mortgage fraud lawsuit involving the actions of bear stearns, the former rival it bought in 2008. new york state filed the civil case monday. it alleges bear stearns misled investors who bought securities based on sub-prime mortgage loans in 2006 and 2007. their collapse led to huge losses. new york state attorney general eric schneiderman said today on cnbc the company's actions were flagrant. >> you can't as a prosecutor allow this conduct conduct to go unpunished and send a message that there's one set of rules for one group of people and another set for others. we brought the case because it was ready. it's the first case ready. we are by no means singling them out. >> holman: the lawsuit is the first to arise out of a federal- state working group that targets alleged misconduct in the financial mel
. with all that information, campaign is able to build teams of like-mindalled volunteers, latinos for obama, pacific islanders for obama. sportsmen for obama. all being recruited as part of the obama ground game. they meet online and then gather in the real world. >> i think we're expecting a few more people who are going to get started so we can keep on with our agenda. >> sreenivasan: this group of volunteers who cared about lesbian, gay, by sexual and transgender issues was preparing to go out and canvass local voters in support of the president. it seems whether it's dashboard or the mobile apps, they serve two purposes: one, to make sure your teams are in communication with one another and another to learn about the voters you're going out and reaching. >> absolutely. we're always going to be collecting information. because that's how, you know, we extend our reach. that's how we can continue to communicate with that person. just one phone call or one email is not going to get that person to be... to the polls on election day. >> sreenivasan: for years campaigns have dreamed of being a
. there was a swiss girl. there was an indian guy, vinay. it was he and a couple of others. >> my roommate was latino. i mean, it was awesome. it was a cultural soup that really tasted good for everyone, you know, and he was in the center of it. >> narrator: eventually, he took an important step. >> i asked, you know, "barry obama. what kind of name is that for a brother? you know, where are you from exactly?" and he said, "well, i'm from hawaii, but my father was kenyan. and his name was barack obama. and i go by barry so that i don't have to explain my name all the time, and go into a long explanation of myself." and so i said, "well, if your name is barack obama, i'm going to call you barack obama because i like that name. >> narrator: in the school's literary magazine, barry now identified himself as barack obama. >> i think the word "barack" is absolutely essential to that identity of being, "i am a man. i am a man with a future. i need to be prepared for whatever that is going to be. i don't know the answers yet. but i sure as heck know i won't get there if i hang out and take things for grante
and the-- see, the president has a number of discreet constituents-- latinos, working women, college-educated women-- to whom he has spoken. the thing. a national debate, you're speaking to everybody at the same time. there's no demographic cliques or subgroups. it's everybody. that's consider i think debates are so important. >> woodruff: we're popping the popcorn. we're on the edge of our seats. we'll see both of you in three hours. we will be back at 9:00 p.m. eastern for special coverage of this debate but our effort effoe ongoing online. we will have a live scream where you can watch the debate and live analysis from our team. we're send our "newshour" hat-cam to a debate watch party here in washington. following the debate, "newshour" political editor christina belland tony will be talking to undecide voters at a google-plus hang out >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": rough flying for american airlines; the pope's butler on trial in rome; chasing the early voters in iowa; a medical breakthrough for critically ill infants and jim lehrer on past debates. but first, with t
voters. so it is sort of counterintuitive. ohio has one sixth percentage of latinos or hispanic voters than the country does at large. i mean it doesn't have the minorities that you associate with sort of democratic growth or democratic coalition. and i really do think david's right, steve ratner did a great job but it was barack obama. and mitt romney was wrong. and this, they're still on the defensive about this, at recently as thursday night in defines, ohio, rob portman, senator from ohio and the surrogate debate substitute for president obama introduced mitt romney saying let's get this straight. mitt romney was the first guy-- barack obama took gm and chrysler through bankruptcy. mitt romney was for guaranteeing loans, and they're still trying to explain it. and he's very much on the defensive. so obama is running better with whites and white males in ohio than he is elsewhere, in large part because of the auto bailout and they've got a great ground game in ohio too. >> we should emphasize it's not a slam-dunk for obama. if you look at the polls it's been a very steady two point
, the latino community." he predicted the g.o.p. will join him in finally passing major immigration reform. for his part, romney fired back in reno, nevada. he said the president's been reduced to misplaced attacks on his record. >> with four... four debates behind us, including the vice presidential debate, the president's been unable to find an... an agenda and to communicate an agenda and to defend an agenda. and that's one reason why i think we all know that he's out of ideas and out of excuses. and in november, you're going to put him out of office. >> reporter: for both sides, the stepped-up pace was a sign of just how tight the race is, in the closing stage of the campaign. over the next 13 days, both candidates will barnstorm a series of swing states where the white house will be won or lost. perhaps none more important than ohio, where the vice presidential candidates were campaigning. >> well, folks, you probably heard the rumor that ohio is going to pick the next president of the united states of america. and i'm happy about that. >> reporter: vice president biden talked up the
and latino studies at the university of illinois in chicago. her books include "by heart/de memoria: cuban women's journeys in and out of exile" and "the lost apple: operation pedro pan, cuban children in the u.s., and the promise of a better future." professor, cuba has been a particularly tough place for its citizens to travel from, for some time. if you stay out of the country for more than 11 months you lose your right to residency. you lose your health care. is this a big change? >> i think it's a very significant change to the extent that this law, which was actually called the law of definitive abandonment, a very brave world, if you will, kind of description here. and the law prevented cubans from returning. initially it was actually 60 days. the 11 months comes much later. but in 1961 if you left for whatever reason and did not return within 60 days, you lost your home, your property, and your right to be returned to your family. so many families really have been divided by this law. now having said this, i think we need to really look at the overall context. perhaps maybe talk ab
these coalitions-- african-americans, latinos and progressive whites. and he was able to pull that together and beat the machine. >> god bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart. >> and that kind of coalition building was incredibly influential for barack. >> narrator: obama's laboratory would be the city's south side. >> we had put an ad in a number of newspapers founa atmmcoity organizer in the south side of chicago. i'm looking for anybody who might be a good organizer, but i particularly need somebody who's african-american. >> and obama at that period of time, he is not sure he is black. for the guys that are hiring him, you know, "you'll do just fine." (people singing gospel music) >> narrator: but not everyone on the south side of chicago embraced the ivy league graduate. >> he had to work with a lot of different church leaders who weren't necessarily receptive to this young guy who came from the ivy league and did not have chicago roots. >> you know, chicago's a town that says, "we don't want nobody that nobody sent." well, barack was somebody that nobody sent. >> and
to win over, whether it's women, whether it's latinos, while president obama was offering specific prescriptions for women's health, for example, for immigration policy, mitt romney said the most important thing, whether you're a student, you need a job. you need a better economy. whether you're a woman asking about pay equity he said you need a job you need a better economy. for him it kept coming back to the same point again and again and again through the 90 minutes. >> ifill: that last question which gave each candidate a chance to redefine himself to clear up a little misunderstanding about themselves was their strategy going into this debate tonight for each of those candidates about what they wanted to do and how they wanted to come away? >> well, i think in the case of president obama, it was certain to be much more aggressive and to lay out a much tougher case against governor romney than he had in the previous debate. for governor romney, i think it was to make sure that he gave as good as he got. i think governor romney had some good moments in this debate tonight. i thi
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)